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Take a Break from AMC to Discover NYC's Best Indie Cinemas

Ditch AMC for a weekend to explore NYC's indie cinemas & arthouse theaters, which feature cult classics and special events for people who prefer the cinema over Netflix.

Dive deeper than the blockbusters at NYC's independent cinemas and arthouse theaters. Explore hidden gems, cult classics & international films at IFC Center, Anthology Film Archives & more. Discover unique New York City venues with special events, filmmaker Q&As, and even dine-in options. Perfect for cinephiles seeking a curated film experience.

Let's face it: the AMC and Regal experience is, well, a bit meh. Sticky floors, questionable butter dispensers, and the constant threat of a rogue cellphone illuminating a climax? No thanks. But luckily, New York boasts a thriving scene of independent cinemas and arthouse theaters, offering a breath of fresh air (and probably better quality popcorn) for those who still prefer their movies at the theater.


So, ditch the megaplexes because we're diving deep into the world of NYC's indies.


IFC Center

Greenwich Village


For those craving the latest independent gems, look no further than the IFC Center in Greenwich Village. This non-profit gem is a haven for everything indie, from quirky documentaries to award-winning dramas. Plus, with their cushy seats and commitment to filmmaker Q&As, it's basically a movie night with your coolest art school professor.


Angelika Film Center (and Village East by Angelika)

East Village


Across town, the Angelika Film Center (and its spankin' new sister location, Village East by Angelika) is another champion of independent cinema. Expect a stellar lineup of international films, alongside hidden gems and cult classics you never knew existed. Pro tip: their concession stand features gourmet popcorn drizzled with things like truffle oil and parmesan cheese.


Roxy Cinema

Tribeca


Speaking of cult classics, the Roxy Cinema in Tribeca is your Art Deco dream come true. This restored gem specializes in first-run independent films alongside rare archival prints and 35mm screenings. Basically, it's like stepping into a bygone era of cinema, complete with the magic of celluloid (and maybe some vintage candy at the concession stand?).


Anthology Film Archives

East Village


Now, if you're the kind of moviegoer who appreciates a good deep dive, then the Anthology Film Archives is your oyster. This non-profit institution is a treasure trove of cinematic history, preserving and showcasing everything from avant-garde silent films to experimental documentaries. It's a place to challenge your movie-watching perceptions and discover hidden gems of cinema.


Film Forum

Manhattan


For a more curated experience, head to Film Forum. These guys specialize in retrospectives, restorations, and revivals, offering a chance to see cinematic masterpieces on the big screen as they were meant to be seen. Plus, their in-depth discussions and special events are perfect for the film student in all of us.


Nitehawk Cinema

Williamsburg


Let's be honest, sometimes a movie night calls for a little somethin' somethin' extra. Enter the glorious world of NYC's dine-in cinemas. Take the Nitehawk Cinema, for example. This Brooklyn institution combines independent and cult classics with a killer cocktail menu and delicious (and, dare we say, IG-worthy?) food options. Think craft beers on tap alongside pizza – basically, the perfect way to fuel your next cinematic obsession.


Metrograph

Lower East Side


The LES neighborhood boasts some fantastic options too, like the Metrograph, a cinematically-focused venue with a commitment to showcasing international and independent cinema alongside their in-house restaurant.


Spectacle Theater

Williamsburg


Feeling a bit more adventurous? Check out Spectacle Theater in Williamsburg. This independent haven not only shows indie flicks but also hosts live music, comedy nights, and other eclectic events, making it a true melting pot of artistic expression.


 

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